Nevada

Three stories which didn't seem worthy of their own full blog entry but each of which are pretty interesting...

Washington State, 06/25/14: Kreidler calls for health insurers to end discrimination based on gender identity

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler is asking all health insurers doing business in Washington state to end discrimination in health insurance based on gender identity and related medical conditions.

In a letter sent to health insurers this morning, Kreidler reminded health insurers that exclusions and denials of coverage on the basis of gender identity are against the Washington Law Against Discrimination (RCW 49.60) and the federal Affordable Care Act (Section 1557).

...“Transgender people are entitled to the same access to health care as everyone else,” said Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler. “Whether specific services are considered medically necessary should be up to the provider to decide on behalf of their patient.”

Good.

Finally, we have Nevada; while their QHP enrollment was pretty lame, their Medicaid expansion has done quite well. They have an estimated 304,000 people eligible for expansion, of which the state has already enrolled about 27%:

There were 467,000 Medicaid enrollees as of the end of April — 50,000 more than anticipated, said Mike Willden, director of the state Department of Health and Human Services. Of those 83,000 people are newly eligible childless adults who did not previously qualify.

Willden projected Nevada's Medicaid numbers will reach 600,000 by the end of the year.

"That is substantial," he said.

A rather depressing end to Nevada's first open enrollment period. The state pushed their extension period far beyond any other state (most states stopped at 4/15; Oregon's was 4/30...Nevada kicked it out another month beyond that to 5/30), and still didn't come close to either their initial target or even my own "fair share" target of 73,000 QHP enrollees:

About 35,700 consumers have purchased insurance coverage through the program. Enrollment is far less than an initial target of 118,000.

(and yes, that 35,700 figure is paid, not total; the total number stood at 47,245 a couple of weeks ago).

First Oregon told Oracle to go pound sand after paying the company hundreds of millions of dollars for a useless website; now Nevada has officially done the same thing to Xerox:

The Silver State Health Insurance Exchange board voted unanimously Tuesday to end its relationship with Xerox, the vendor contracted in 2012 to build the exchange’s Nevada Health Link website.

In place of Xerox, the exchange will adopt the federal Healthcare.gov exchange’s eligibility and enrollment functions for the sign-up period that begins Nov. 15, though it will keep its status and funding as a state-controlled system. The exchange will also issue a request for proposals to evaluate replacement systems in coming years. A new platform could come from a state with a functional marketplace, or from a vendor with a similar, proven program.

Unlike Massachusetts, which is taking a dual-path approach (they're scrambling to replace their own crappy site with a new one while simultaneously preparing to move over to HC.gov just in case the first plan doesn't pan out in time), Nevada is sort of doing the opposite: They're moving over to HC.gov this year, but reserving the right to try a do-over on their own exchange for 2016 and beyond.

Minor update out of the only state whose ACA exchange is still officially open: QHPs up around 1,400, paid up around 200 since last week:

Update as of 5/10: 47,245 Nevadans confirm Qualified Health Plan selections. 35,034 have paid.

— Nevada Health Link (@NVHealthLink) May 14, 2014

Nevada is the only exchange still officially open for "normal" private QHP enrollments (although of course SHOP, Medicaid, etc. are all year-round). WIth this update, Nevada's paid QHP rate jumps from 71% up to 76% (still not great, but an impressive spike in one week...more the existing enrollees catching up with their payments than new ones being added):

The board overseeing Nevada Health Link was told Thursday that nearly 35,000 people had enrolled in a qualified health plan as of May 3, halfway through a two-month special enrollment period that ends May 30.

Another 11,000 have selected plans but not yet paid for them.

Managers believe they had QHP enrollment information and premium payments for 34,820 residents as of May 3.

Nevada is one of the few states extending their open enrollment beyond the "standard" 4/15 deadline; residents have until 5/30 to complete their enrollments for 2014:

Update as of 4/19: 45,291 Consumers have selected Qualified Health Plans, 32,365 have paid.

— Nevada Health Link (@NVHealthLink) April 22, 2014

Update as of 4/15: 44,468 consumers confirmed Qualified Health Plan selections through Nevada Health Link, 30,176 have paid.

— Nevada Health Link (@NVHealthLink) April 17, 2014

I think this is the first Nevada update I've posted which didn't come from the Nevada Health Link's Twitter feed. Technically only 28,208 have actually paid their first premium so far, but another 4,332 have scheduled their payment which is certainly a huge step ahead of having "enrolled but not even arranged for a payment" (and my model has 7% of this total being lopped out for potential non-payment anyway). So, 32,540 it is until further notice.

And the number of people who enrolled in and paid for a qualified health plan through the exchange hit 28,208 on April 5, up from 25,899 people on March 31. Another 4,332 consumers have scheduled payments.

Thanks to deaconblues for all three of these items:

Avalere Health, with whom I've both clashed and agreed with on ACA-enabled Medicaid enrollments in the past, is projecting as high as a net gain of 4.3M Medicaid enrollees through the end of March:

700K to 1.3M Additional Medicaid Enrollees through March, If Current Trends Continue.

However, March and April figures could bring more dramatic increases if outreach and enrollment efforts targeting the end of exchange open enrollment translate into new Medicaid enrollees. Specifically, if Medicaid sign-ups follow a similar pattern as exchanges, new Medicaid enrollees could reach 4.3 million by the end of March. In addition, recent figures released by CMS do not account for individuals assessed eligible for Medicaid through HealthCare.gov who have yet to be determined eligible by states.

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