Georgia

Back in February, I wrote about how the state of Georgia, in an eyebrow-raising move, announced that they were moving from the federal ACA exchange (HealthCare.Gov) onto their own state-based ACA exchange.

While numerous other states have already done the same thing (and several more are in the process of doing so as well), Georgia's move to their own enrollment platform was especially noteworthy for two reasons:

First, because it represents as complete 180-degree policy turn from their prior attempts (over the course of several years) to eliminate any formal ACA exchange (federal or state-based) in favor of outsourcing it to private insurance carriers & 3rd-party web brokers.

Secondly, because of the timeframe involved:

Georgia's health department doesn't publish their annual rate filings publicly, but they don't hide them either; I was able to acquire pretty much everything via a simple FOIA request. Huge kudos to the GA OCI folks!

Unfortunately, it looks like less than half of Georgia's small group market carriers have submitted their filings (alternately, it's conceivable that the other have have pulled out of the G small group market, though I highly doubt that). Only four of the eleven carriers offering policies in 2023 have filings included in the package sent to me by GA OCI. Not sure what that's about.

In any event, Georgia's individual market has grown dramatically over the past year (813,000 people vs. 660,000 a year ago), but the requested 2024 rate filings are pretty ugly, ranging from a somewhat reasonable 6.4% to as high as 27.7% for Cigna (ouch). The weighted average overall is just over 15% even.

During this springs Congressional kabuki theater regarding raising the federal debt ceiling, one of the biggest points of contention was House Republicans insistence on tying work requirements (w/stringent reporting) to Medicaid eligibility.

"Work requirements" is as old a saw for Republican politicians as "selling insurance across state lines," and it's just as ineffective and counterproductive (as well as simply being cruel). This debate has been held numerous times before, and the upside of such requirements has been debunked repeatedly, but here he go again:

As Joan McCarter of Daily Kos put it way back in 2015:

A few weeks ago, I reported that both Nevada and Oklahoma had placed insolvent insurance carrier Friday Health Plans under receivership, leaving just two states left to do so (North Carolina and Colorado, which happens to also be the home to Friday's corporate headquarters).

It turned out that I was correct about Oklahoma, but had jumped the gun slightly re. Nevada; the insurance commissioner had petitioned the court to put Friday into receivership, but hadn't actually done so yet.

Well, it turns out my error re. Nevada has been rendered moot as of yesterday; via the Nevada Division of Insurance:

JUNE 21, 2023 - Court orders receivership for Friday Health Plans of Nevada

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – June 21, 2023

Back in February, I wrote about how the state of Georgia, in an eyebrow-raising move, announced that they were moving from the federal ACA exchange (HealthCare.Gov) onto their own state-based ACA exchange.

While numerous other states have already done the same thing (and several more are in the process of doing so as well), Georgia's move to their own enrollment platform was especially noteworthy for two reasons:

First, because it represents as complete 180-degree turn from their prior attempts (over the course of several years) to eliminate any formal ACA exchange (federal or state-based) in favor of outsourcing it to private insurance carriers & 3rd-party web brokers.

Secondly, because of the timeframe involved:

Wow. It took less than 12 hours from this announcement by the COLORADO Dept. of Regulatory Agencies to be released...

Friday Health Plans, Inc. Winding Down Business

What Happened?

Friday Health Plans, Inc., the parent company of Friday Health Plan of Colorado, ,Inc. (HMO), has announced that it will begin to wind down its business activities throughout the country, working in close conjunction with state regulators, including the Colorado Division of Insurance.

In recent months, it became apparent that the parent company would need to raise substantial capital to continue. Friday was ultimately unable to raise that capital and on June 1, Friday Health Plans, Inc. (Parent) stated publicly that they would begin to wind down.

...to this press release from the NEVADA Division of Insurance:

 

October 2022:

Texas: Friday Health Plans Bails; Another ~230K Enrollees Will Have To Pick A Different Day Of The Week

It was just four days ago that Bright Healthcare, which had been aggressively expanding their individual market coverage area footprint as recently as a year ago, suddenly announced that they were doing a complete 180 and instead pulling out of virtually the entire individual & small group markets nationally starting in January 2023.

...Well, just one day after the Bright Healthcare bombshell news broke, Texas-based health insurance broker Jenny Chumbley Hogue sounded the alarm on another large carrier bailing on Texas next year:

And its confirmed. Email received from Friday. Buckle up folks! Individual OEP in Texas is going to be a bumpy ride! https://t.co/AMNJ4rPyr3

October 2022:

...Well, just one day after the Bright Healthcare bombshell news broke, Texas-based health insurance broker Jenny Chumbley Hogue sounded the alarm on another large carrier bailing on Texas next year:

TX Marketplace Rumor Mill: Friday Health Plans is OUT for 2023. @LouiseNorris @charles_gaba @bjdickmayhew

— Jenny Chumbley Hogue (@kgmom219) October 12, 2022

And its confirmed. Email received from Friday. Buckle up folks! Individual OEP in Texas is going to be a bumpy ride! https://t.co/AMNJ4rPyr3

— Jenny Chumbley Hogue (@kgmom219) October 12, 2022

 

October 2022:

Texas: Friday Health Plans Bails; Another ~230K Enrollees Will Have To Pick A Different Day Of The Week

It was just four days ago that Bright Healthcare, which had been aggressively expanding their individual market coverage area footprint as recently as a year ago, suddenly announced that they were doing a complete 180 and instead pulling out of virtually the entire individual & small group markets nationally starting in January 2023.

...Well, just one day after the Bright Healthcare bombshell news broke, Texas-based health insurance broker Jenny Chumbley Hogue sounded the alarm on another large carrier bailing on Texas next year:

In February, I wrote about how the state of Georgia, in an eyebrow-raising move, announced that they were moving from the federal ACA exchange (HealthCare.Gov) onto their own state-based ACA exchange.

While numerous other states have already done the same thing (and several more are in the process of doing so as well), Georgia's move to their own enrollment platform was especially noteworthy for two reasons:

First, because it represents as complete 180-degree turn from their prior attempts (over the course of several years) to eliminate any formal ACA exchange (federal or state-based) in favor of outsourcing it to private insurance carriers & 3rd-party web brokers.

Secondly, because of the timeframe involved:

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