Charles Gaba's blog

Washington HealthPlan Finder

via Washington HealthPlanFinder:

  • Brand new Cascade Care Savings and high-quality Cascade Care plans provide Washington Healthplanfinder customers more savings on their health plans than ever before

The majority of Washington state residents who buy their health insurance through Washington Healthplanfinder can find lower-cost plans that offer them the same level of coverage they had in 2022. An average of 80% of Washington Healthplanfinder enrollees can save on their health premium by shopping and switching to a lower-cost plan. Customers can save an average of $1,300 annually ($110 monthly) for the same level of coverage they’re already paying for.

CMS Logo

The ACA includes a long list of codified instructions about what's required under the law, but many of the specific details are left up to the agency responsible for implementing it since the legal text itself can't possibly cover every conceivable detail involved. The major provisions of the ACA fall under the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), and within that, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS).

Each year, CMS issues a long, wonky document called the Notice of Benefit & Payment Parameters (NBPP) for the Affordable Care Act. This is basically a list of tweaks to some of the specifics of how the ACA is actually implemented.

CMS Logo

The ACA includes a long list of codified instructions about what's required under the law, but many of the specific details are left up to the agency responsible for implementing it since the legal text itself can't possibly cover every conceivable detail involved. The major provisions of the ACA fall under the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), and within that, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS).

Each year, CMS issues a long, wonky document called the Notice of Benefit & Payment Parameters (NBPP) for the Affordable Care Act. This is basically a list of tweaks to some of the specifics of how the ACA is actually implemented.

CMS Logo

The ACA includes a long list of codified instructions about what's required under the law, but many of the specific details are left up to the agency responsible for implementing it since the legal text itself can't possibly cover every conceivable detail involved. The major provisions of the ACA fall under the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), and within that, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS).

Each year, CMS issues a long, wonky document called the Notice of Benefit & Payment Parameters (NBPP) for the Affordable Care Act. This is basically a list of tweaks to some of the specifics of how the ACA is actually implemented.

CMS Logo

 

The ACA includes a long list of codified instructions about what's required under the law, but many of the specific details are left up to the agency responsible for implementing it since the legal text itself can't possibly cover every conceivable detail involved. The major provisions of the ACA fall under the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), and within that, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS).

Each year, CMS issues a long, wonky document called the Notice of Benefit & Payment Parameters (NBPP) for the Affordable Care Act. This is basically a list of tweaks to some of the specifics of how the ACA is actually implemented.

CMS Logo

The ACA includes a long list of codified instructions about what's required under the law, but many of the specific details are left up to the agency responsible for implementing it since the legal text itself can't possibly cover every conceivable detail involved. The major provisions of the ACA fall under the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), and within that, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS).

Each year, CMS issues a long, wonky document called the Notice of Benefit & Payment Parameters (NBPP) for the Affordable Care Act. This is basically a list of tweaks to some of the specifics of how the ACA is actually implemented.

CMS Logo

 

The Affordable Care Act includes a long list of codified instructions about what's required under the law. However, like any major piece of legislation, many of the specific details are left up to the agency responsible for implementing the law.

While the PPACA is itself a lengthy document, it would have to be several times longer yet in order to cover every conceivable detail involved in operating the ACA exchanges, Medicaid expansion and so forth. The major provisions of the ACA fall under the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), and within that, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS)

Every year, CMS issues a long, wonky document called the Notice of Benefit & Payment Parameters (NBPP) for the Affordable Care Act. This is basically a list of proposed tweaks to some of the specifics of how the ACA is actually implemented for the following year (actually, it's the year after the following year, since the final rule is generally released in mid-December).

For example, here's what the actual PPACA legislative text itself said about the annual Open Enrollment Period (OEP):

Wyoming

With South Dakota becoming the latest holdout state to finally expand Medicaid to adults earning up to 138% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) under the Affordable Care Act last month, there's now just 11 states remaining which still haven't done so.

The smallest of these, which is also the smallest state in the country, is Wyoming, which has had a long & storied history when it comes to Medicaid expansion fakeouts. The "Equality State" legislature has considered expanding Medicaid to the roughly 19,000 residents who would become newly eligible for the program eight times since the ACA was signed into law in 2010, only to see approval of it fail at one stage or another every time.

 Well, according to this article by Katie Roenigk at "County 10" in Fremont County, Wyoming, it looks like the 9th time may be the charm:

Pennie Logo

via Pennie, Pennsylvania's state-based ACA exchange:

Pennsylvanians must visit pennie.com before December 15 for coverage beginning January 1st. 

Harrisburg, PA –– December 15th marks the Open Enrollment Period deadline for 2023 health coverage beginning New Year’s Day through Pennie, Pennsylvania’s official online health insurance marketplace.

Pennie keeps insurance costs down, and Open Enrollment is the prime opportunity for Pennsylvanians to receive savings on quality health plans. Pennie is the only source for financial savings to lower monthly premiums or out-of-pocket costs. Nine out of 10 customers qualify for savings, which averages over $530 a month. 

Covered California Logo

via Covered California:

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A new federal rule takes effect on Monday, opening the door for nearly 400,000 people to enroll in a more-affordable health plan through Covered California. The change means families who have been ineligible for financial help because one member is insured through an employer may now be eligible for subsidies to lower the cost of their premiums if they enroll in a health plan offered through Covered California.

“The door to more-affordable health coverage is opening today for hundreds of thousands of Californians,” said Jessica Altman, executive director of Covered California. “There are families across California who will now be able to save hundreds of dollars a month, and thousands of dollars a year, if they switch from employer-sponsored coverage to a Covered California plan.”

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