Charles Gaba's blog

via the NJ Dept. of Banking & Insurance:

New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance Acting Commissioner Justin Zimmerman today announced an expanded Special Enrollment Period for individuals who are no longer eligible for NJ FamilyCare and qualify for health insurance through Get Covered New Jersey, the state’s Official Health Insurance Marketplace. The expanded Special Enrollment Period will be available to anyone who lost NJ FamilyCare coverage due to resumption of eligibility reviews regardless of the date they lost coverage. Previously, individuals had 120 days to enroll after their NJ FamilyCare coverage ended.

As required by federal law, the Department of Human Services restarted eligibility reviews for NJ FamilyCare on April 1, 2023. Those who no longer qualify for NJ FamilyCare because their income is too high may be eligible to obtain health coverage through Get Covered New Jersey and may be able to get help paying for premiums.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Finally, we come to HOUSEHOLD INCOME BRACKETS.

This is, of course, extremely important since household income is one of the most critical factors in calculating how much financial assistance enrollees receive (or if they're eligible for Advance Premium Tax Credits (ATPC) at all).

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Next up: METAL LEVELS.

If you've ever wondered why healthcare wonks (myself included) almost never even bring up the ACA's Catastrophic Level plans and why the only time I ever discuss Platinum Plans is in the context of high-CSR enrollees being eligible for "Secret Platinum" plans (labeled as Silver), this table should explain why.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Next up: Age brackets, gender, racial/ethnic groups and urban/rural communities. I'm also throwing in the stand-alone Dental Plan table here for the heck of it since I don't know where else to include it.

I don't have a ton to say about any of these, really. It's always interesting to me to see that 1.7% of ACA exchange enrollees are 65 or older. Not sure why they aren't on Medicare but I'm sure there are logical reasons.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Next up: Premiums, Advance Premium Tax Credits (APTC) and Cost Sharing Reduction (CSR) assistance.

Nationally, the average unsubsidized premiums for 2023 exchange-based Open Enrollment Period enrollees is $605/month, exactly the same as 2023.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Now it's time to move on to the actual demographic breakout of the 2024 Open Enrollment Period (OEP) Qualified Health Plan (QHP) enrollees.

First up is breaking out new enrollees vs. existing enrollees who either actively re-enroll in an exchange plan for another year or who passively allow themselves to be automatically renewed into their current plan (or to be "mapped" to a similar plan if the current one is no longer available).

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Moments ago the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) posted the official 2024 ACA Open Enrollment Period Public Use Files. Let's dig in!

The table below has the data for both Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) in all 50 states + DC as well as Basic Health Plan (BHP) enrollment in Minnesota and New York only, compared to the 2023 OEP.

See Part 1 Here

Again, here's the Republican Study Committee (RSC, aka House Republicans) 2025 Budget Proposal. The ACA-related section begins on page 86:

Under the RSC Health Care Task Force plan, protections pertaining to guaranteed issue and the prohibition on coverage exclusions would be retailored to reward continuous coverage and promote portability in the individual marketplace.

"RETAILORED." DANGER WILL ROBINSON.

Scratch Guaranteed Issue.

Additionally, to provide Americans with options that fit their individualized needs, each state would again be allowed to determine the minimum attributes and cost-sharing parameters of plans to best meet the needs of their own citizens. In no case, however, would carriers be able to rescind, increase rates, or refuse to renew one’s health insurance simply because a person developed a condition after enrollment.

As I noted back in December...

Since Donald Trump was defeated in the 2020 Presidential election, most people seemed to be under the impression that the Republican Party's decade-long obsession with tearing down President Obama's signature legislative accomplishment, the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act, was finally over.

Healthcare journalist extraordinaire Jonathan Cohn even pulled the trigger on publishing his definitive history of the ACA, The Ten Year War...although honestly, there was still one remaining major legal loose end to tie up which wouldn't happen until about eight months later.

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