GRAHAM-CASSIDY REPEAL BILL DEADLINE:

Time: D H M S

Flint

After a year and a half of allowing the residents of Flint, Michigan to be poisoned, GOP Governor Rick Snyder, in response to growing public pressure, finally decided to do something decent for once:

Gov. Rick Snyder said Tuesday he will seek permission from the Obama administration to allow all young people in Flint the chance to receive publicly funded health care services for lead exposure amid the city's contaminated drinking water crisis.

...The White House and federal Department of Health and Human Services did not have an immediate response Tuesday to Snyder's initiative targeting Flint residents up to age 21 through the expansion of Medicaid.

Even then, he wasn't exactly in a big hurry to do so; he waited another 3 weeks to get around to actually submitting his request:

UPDATE: OK, the live stream was over hours ago. I can no longer embed the entire hearing, but here's a direct link to watch it over at C-SPAN's website.

However, just to give you a taste of how jaw-dropping this hearing was, watch Rep. Elijah Cumming's question period with the head of Michigan's Dept. of Environmental Quality:

For a full write-up of the hearing, visit Eclectablog.

Isaac Bashevis Singer is famous for, among other things, his collection of Yiddish folk tales about The Wise Men of Chelm, a town in Poland which, according to the folk tales, was populated entirely by fools.

One of the stories about the people of Chelm was about a playground located near the top of a cliff. Every once in awhile, a child would fall off the cliff and injure themselves on the ground below.

The Wise Men of Chelm came up with an ingenious solution to the problem: They built a hospital at the bottom of the cliff. That way, the children could be rushed into the emergency room quickly for medical treatment.

I was reminded of this story when reading the following AP article posted moments ago:

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder will propose $30 million in state funding...

UPDATE: I thought this was obvious, but apparently not: I'm not saying that a complete relocation of the entire population of Flint will be necessary, I'm just trying to get some sort of feel for how much it would theoretically cost if they had to be relocated.

For example, Wired Magazine has posted a more detailed analysis of the actual cost/mechanics/logistics involved in ripping out and replacing the entire city's piping system. The good news? The estimate of just replacing the pipes comes in at "only" $60 million, vs. the $1.5 billion I've seen thrown around. The bad news?

"A September estimate, only recently released by Michigan governor Rick Snyder, puts the cost of replacing all the lead pipes in Flint at $60 million. And the project will take 15 years.

Presented without comment, because what the f*ck else am I supposed to add here?

LANSING -- In January of 2015, when state officials were telling worried Flint residents their water was safe to drink, they also were arranging for coolers of purified water in Flint's State Office Building so employees wouldn't have to drink from the taps, according to state government e-mails released Thursday by the liberal group Progress Michigan.

A Jan. 7, 2015, notice from the state Department of Technology, Management and Budget, which oversees state office buildings,references a notice about a violation of drinking water standards that had recently been sent out by the City of Flint.

...State officials could not immediately answer e-mailed questions about the water purchases, including how long the state continued to buy bottled water for state employees in Flint while telling Flint residents the water was safe to drink. An official said the administration was "looking into these issues."