2018 MIDTERM ELECTION

Time: D H M S

"But, but...how many have PAID???" in Rhode Island?

Christine Ferguson, executive director of HealthSource RI, said 91% of the 27,968 individuals who signed up for private plans during the open enrollment period from Oct. 1 to March 31 paid their first premiums by the April 23 deadline. Analysts have pointed to that percentage as a key test of whether the enrollment figures were as strong as they looked.

“My takeaway of that 91% is that we have work to do to keep them, but that’s a high conversion rate, and it’s a testament to the work that the staff’s done to really work with people,” Ferguson told WPRI.com.

“I think it’s a reflection of the work that’s been done in the marketplace, the care that we took in the kinds of plans we offered and the range, and I think it is a reflection of the system working reasonably well,” she said. “I think for us the real issue – and I think the thing that people have not paid enough attention to nationally – is retention.”

The District of Columbia is one of a handful of exchanges which went beyond the 4/15 extension period out to 4/30; here's DC's final tally:

From October 1, 2013 to April 30, 2014, 44,833 people have enrolled through DC Health Link in private health plans or Medicaid:

  • 11,106 people enrolled in private health plans through the DC Health Link individual and family marketplace;
  • 20,497 people were determined eligible for Medicaid coverage through DC Health Link; and
  • 13,230 people enrolled through the DC Health Link small business marketplace.

I actually already posted an entry using this exact same story out of the WV Gazette, but thanks to Esther Ferington for pointing out something else that I missed in the article:

Health insurance enrollment numbers through the federal exchange surged to 18,631 between March 31 and the April 15 federal extension, Highmark West Virginia President Fred Earley said.

Highmark, the only insurer participating in West Virginia's Affordable Care Act insurance marketplace, also reported that 6,171 people have enrolled directly through Highmark since Oct. 1. 

The numbers released represent the highest jump in enrollment the company has seen since the ACA rollout; it reported in April that, as of March 31, 14,839 people had enrolled through the exchange and 5,292 purchased plans directly through Highmark. 

I'm assuming this is due to correction of some clerical errors, double entries, unpaid or cancelled acounts and so on, but the 4/26 county-by-county tally from Connect for Health Colorado is actually about 1,500 lower than the 4/19 total from the HHS report:

123,899

 

Given that they were only at 8,742 just a few days earlier, Hawaii managed to pull off an impressive (relatively-speaking) mini-surge in the final few days:

The Hawaii Health Connector, the online marketplace responsible for implementing President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act in Hawaii, enrolled 9,800 residents as of Wednesday’s final deadline for its first year of providing coverage.

The Connector collected 31,310 individual applications as of Saturday but was unable to enroll two-thirds of those applicants despite a push in the final two months.

Simple and to the point: These are all expansion enrollees:

In Illinois, an additional 287,000 have enrolled in expanded Medicaid coverage.

(I previously had the total at 350K, but that included determinations, not actual enrollees).

Wow. I'm not certain what the "strict expansion" vs. "woodworker" breakout is here, but am assuming it's roughly a 3:1 ratio:

An even greater number in Ohio, 156,899, were deemed eligible for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Plan, or CHIP, government plans for low-income families that have been expanded under the act. That, however, is only a partial number, based on information that individuals provided when they contacted the federal health care marketplace to see about insurance. According to state figures released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Ohio has seen a combined Medicaid-CHIP surge of 208,280 since the Affordable Care Act, or ACA.

The key point of this article is that it specifically designates the 98K as being expansion enrollees (no woodworkers/churn):

Another 98,000 New Jersey residents were determined to be eligible for the new, expanded version of Medicaid.

UPDATE: More accurate number from another source:

Another 98,240 Garden State residents enrolled in the expanded Medicaid program, NJ Family Care. 

This is really more of a confirmation of my own estimates than anything; I had Iowa down as around 81K "Strict Expansion" plus another 800 or so "Woodworkers". The actual total appears to be slightly less: 78,860. Not sure what the breakout between the two is, I'm going to assume roughly 75K "strict" and another 3,860 "woodworkers" for now:

The federal report also said that 78,860 Iowans more were enrolled in Medicaid or related programs at the end of March than were enrolled in those programs last fall. Medicaid is a joint federal and state health-care program for the poor. Under the Affordable Care Act, states could opt to expand their Medicaid programs' rules to allow more poor, working-age adults to join. Iowa chose to do so with a pair of programs, the Health and Wellness Plan and the Marketplace Choice Plan, which have similarities to Medicaid. There is no deadline for Medicaid enrollment. People who qualify for the public plans can sign up any time.

This is really part of the actual HHS report, but I haven't had a chance to plug in the Medicaid numbers for every state yet so I'm including it here for now:

The state reports that nearly 263,000 Marylanders have gained Medicaid coverage in 2014.

Again, those extra 11 days seem to be a bit more significant than you'd think; SC was at about 115K according to the HHS report, so they've added another 3,500 or so since 4/19:

Health and Human Services officials said 118,324 state residents — or about 80 percent of the total 146,683 — selected a private health insurance plan. They said 28,359 were eligible for Medicaid.

Remember, the HHS report from yesterday only runs through 4/19...there's still 11 days worth of data missing from most states...

DOVER, Del. (AP) — Final enrollment numbers released by state officials Thursday show that 14,397 Delawareans signed up for health insurance coverage under the federal Affordable Care Act in the first year of open enrollment.

....Health and Social Services Secretary Rita Landgraf told the state Health Care Commission that 4,217 other Delawareans were found eligible for coverage under expanded Medicaid rules the state adopted as part of an effort to reduce the number of uninsured residents.

There's some off-exchange numbers here as well (6,171), but that's from Highmark, so I can't double-count it (part of BCBSA).

However, the Medicaid/CHIP numbers continue to astonish in WV:

The DHHS also reported that 136,418 West Virginians enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP through the end of March. According to Jeremiah Samples, deputy secretary for the state’s Department of Health and Human Resources, West Virginia has enrolled 117,522 people in expanded Medicaid — more than twice the 63,000 that actuarial studies had predicted for the first year of enrollment.

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, the total number of people eligible for ACA Medicaid expansion in WV is around 143,000...meaning that they've managed to achieve an amazing 82% of this goal in the just 7 months.

A reader sent in an interesting report on the DoD's TRICARE program, which apparently was already an existing military version of the ACA "young adults on parents plans" provision. Prior to the ACA, TRICARE only covered young adults up to 21 or 23; the ACA expanded this to the same 26 year old cut-off as non-military families:

Page 52 - As shown in the chart at left, enrollment went from over 21,000 in FY 2012 to almost 31,000 in FY 2013. 

Also, although TYA began with the Standard option, Prime now accounts for almost 60 percent of total TYA enrollment.

This is in reference to the Tricare Young Adult program coverage for those under 26. This is a small amount but doesn't seem to fit anywhere except the under 26 coverage.

Tricare used to cover dependents under 21 with extension to 23 for those in school. The ACA enable expansion to under 26 for a fee ($180/month)

I'm not adding this to the actual spreadsheet since a) it's such a tiny number and b) it's hard to say how many of the 10K increase is specifically due to the ACA, but I thought it was worth at least mentioning.

As I noted yesterday, there are three states which had unusually large discrepancies between the official HHS and state exchange QHP enrollments:

  • New York came in over 65,000 lower than the number I had for a simple reason: The New York exchange lumps enrollees in their Child Health Plus program in with QHPs, even though technically this isn't a QHP program. There were over 40,000 of these as of the end of February; this number has climbed to 65,028 as of 4/19.
    Since Child Health Plus is privately funded (and therefore isn't on the Medicaid/CHIP side), but also isn't officially a QHP either according to HHS, I've moved it over to the "Off Exchange QHP" column.

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