END OF 2018 OPEN ENROLLMENT PERIOD (42 states)

Time: D H M S

Allison Marre should work for a movie studio marketing department.

From Gelf Magazine, January 2, 2009:

The critic blurb is a staple of arts advertising. Yet if you look behind some blurbs, you'll find quotes out of context, quote whores, and other questionable ad practices. Blurb Racket exposes the truth behind critics blurbs in movie ads from the New York Times.

For the second straight year, Gelf is unveiling its favorite blurbs of the year (see our favorites from 2007). Each one exemplifies a deceptive practice that is near the top of the blurb writer's toolbox. Don't like a review? Rearrange it, or cut out the negativity, or change a word entirely. Or even better, find a non-critic associated with a reputable publication who raved, and use that.

Examples from the article (and the version from a year earlier):

  • Entertainment Weekly: "Katherine Heigl glows!"
  • Actual line: "Katherine Heigl glows, but 27 Dresses' formulaic romantic comedy stumbles on the way to the altar."
  • Jack Mathews, New York Daily News: "Hysterically … entertaining."
  • Actual line: "The action in this fast-paced, hysterically overproduced and surprisingly entertaining film is as realistic as a Road Runner cartoon...The plot is a kind of queasy exploitation of 9/11. … Mark Bomback's script lacks authenticity …"

From Allison Marre, HHS Dept. National Spokesperson, less than an hour ago (h/t Kimberly Leonard for the heads up):

Even Charles Gaba, the author of ACAsignups.net admits in his analysis, “The simple truth is: Yes, full-price, unsubsidized premiums for individual market healthcare policies probably have doubled since 2013…” His analysis of the report drives home that Obamacare’s one-size-fits all mandates and regulations have driven up prices for all.

Here's the actual quote she's referring to (emphasis in original):

Don't fall for it. The simple truth is: Yes, full-price, unsubsidized premiums for individual market healthcare policies probably have doubled since 2013...but that's primarily because they have to actually cover healthcare and carriers can no longer cherry-pick who they're sold to.

And of course, the blog entry that comes from is literally titled "New HHS ASPE report is likely 100% accurate...and mostly meaningless."

Pleased to make your acquaintence, Allison. I guess I should feel complimented that you at least visit the website, anyway...