END OF 2018 OPEN ENROLLMENT PERIOD (41 states)

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If the ACA had this kind of approval 6 months ago it wouldn't be in danger of being repealed today.

Presented without comment other than to say "My, how things have changed..."

In strategy and substance, the American public disagrees with the course that President Trump and congressional Republicans are pursuing to replace the Affordable Care Act with conservative policies, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll.

Large majorities oppose the ideas at the heart of the most recent GOP negotiations to forge a plan that could pass in the House.

...Public sentiment is particularly lopsided in favor of an aspect of the current health-care law that blocks insurers from charging more or denying coverage to customers with medical conditions. Roughly 8 in 10 Democrats, 7 in 10 independents and even a slight majority of Republicans say that should continue to be a national mandate...

...many Americans appear leery in general about a major overhaul to the health-care law often called Obamacare, with 61 percent preferring to “keep and try to improve” it, compared with 37 percent who say they want to “repeal and replace” it...more than 6 in 10 independents and nearly 9 in 10 Democrats favor working within its framework.

...A 43 percent plurality of Americans say he [Trump] should work with Democrats to change the law, while 26 percent would rather Trump work with the conservative Republicans. Another 24 percent volunteer that he should work with both groups.

...The new survey suggests significant political risk to Trump in trying to undermine the law, with a mere 13 percent saying he should try to make it fail as soon as possible. By contrast, nearly 8 in 10 (79 percent) say he should try to make the ACA work as well as possible, including roughly 6 in 10 Republicans and 8 in 10 independents.

...The survey finds 62 percent of Americans also support keeping federal requirements that many plans cover preventive services, maternity and pediatric care, hospitalization and prescription drugs, while 33 percent say states should decide what, if any, minimum coverage should be provided. Just under half of Republicans (46 percent) favor federal requirements, with support at 67 percent among independents and 80 percent among Democrats.

...Despite that sharp difference, majorities in both groups of states want to preserve two core ACA insurance rules, the poll shows. In states that did not expand Medicaid, 65 percent support continuing to forbid insurers from charging more or refusing to cover people with preexisting medical conditions — compared with 73 percent in Medicaid-expansion states. Similarly, on the question of whether to retain the ACA’s “essential benefits,” 56 percent of people in non-expansion states support the idea, compared with 67 percent in states that expanded Medicaid.