GRAHAM-CASSIDY REPEAL BILL DEADLINE:

Time: D H M S

New York: Amazingly detailed interactive enrollment map of NYC...by zip code!

Hat Tip To: 
Dan Goldberg

This is absolutely awesome...and extremely frustrating at the same time. Dan Goldberg and his chums at CNY have put together another extremely detailed breakdown of ACA enrollments in New York City, with QHPs, Medicaid and CHIP enrollees sorted out by individual zip code (a pretty herculean task given how many zip codes there are in NYC). Even more interesting (from my perspective, anyway) is that they've managed to get the current enrollment figures--updated through September. Since the NY exchange pointedly informed me back in June that they had no plans to release updated enrollment figures during the off-season at all, this is a huge development from my POV.

The only problem, of course, is that this map only gives the tally for NYC itself (about 8.4 million people total) not the rest of the state (about 19.6 million). Since my data is focused on the state-level numbers, this is frustrating; so close, and yet so far. I suppose I could extrapolate the numbers by multiplying each by 2.3x, but that doesn't work because the demographics are so vastly different between the two.

Anyway, for NYC itself, there's gobs of data-nuggety goodness to be found:

During the last 12 months, more than 660,000 New York City residents enrolled in Medicaid and an additional 157,000 signed up for a private insurance plan through the state's health insurance exchange, which was created as part of the A.C.A.

In 2012, the last year for which city data is available, there were 1.2 million uninsured adults in New York City. Because no one is tracking how many 2014 enrollees were insured in 2012, it's impossible to say for certain what the city's new uninsured rate is, but the state does know that roughly 93 percent of Medicaid enrollees were uninsured at the time of their enrollment and 63 percent of those who purchased private insurance were uninsured when they enrolled.

That suggests a drop of nearly 60 percent, from 1.2 million New Yorkers to somewhere around 487,000.

Data nerds should check it out.